5 Reasons to Spay or Neuter Your Pet

You might be thinking about a special person in your life this month, but February is also a time to think your pets! In addition to Valentine’s Day, we’re also celebrating National Spay/Neuter Awareness Month. If you haven’t already, this is a great time to take your pet in to get spayed or neutered. And if you’re wondering whether or not you should, here are five reasons why it’s important.

1. It saves lives!

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Source: Pixabay

According to the Humane Society, between six and eight million animals enter shelters every year. While about half of those will end up getting adopted, the rest are tragically euthanized. It’s clear that pet overpopulation is a big problem! When responsible pet owners spay and neuter their pets, they are working to solve that problem.

2. It’s good for your pet’s health.

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Source: Pixabay

Spaying and neutering can reduce the risk of certain health conditions. For example, spaying female pets before their first litter can help to prevent uterine infections and breast tumors, while neutering your male pets can prevent prostate problems (see ASPCA). This article from USA Today lists spaying and neutering as one of the key factors related to longer life spans in pets.

3. It saves money.

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Source: Pixabay

While some pet owners may shy away from the cost involved in spaying or neutering their pets, it really does save money in the end. If your pet is healthier, you’ll have fewer vet bills. Treating the type of health problems mentioned above can get expensive, so avoiding them is going to be good for your wallet. Caring for litters of puppies and kittens can be also be costly.

Fortunately, there are lost cost spay and neuter programs all over the country. Check out this Humane Society page for an easy provider search as well as some suggestions for what to do if you can’t find an affordable option in your area.

4. It can prevent bad behavior.

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Source: Pixabay

Some unsavory pet habits are less often seen in spayed or neutered pets. These include the tendency to mark territory by spraying urine all over, mounting other pets or people, roaming, and aggression (see ASPCA). Of course, spaying or neutering won’t completely solve all of these problems, but it can go a long way toward preventing them.

5. It’s good for your community.

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Source: Pixabay

Pet overpopulation isn’t just bad for the pets who end up getting euthanized, according to this WebMD article. It’s also bad for the community. Stray animals living on the streets can cause all sorts of problems, from property damage to car accidents. Seeing that your pets are spayed or neutered helps reduce the number of animals that wind up as strays.

Show your love for your pets, your community, and domestic animals everywhere by spaying or neutering your pets this month!

February’s Adoptable Dog is Scooter!

By: Torie Beckwithscooter-5

Scooter is a playful, loving, very photogenic pitbull-mix. She loves to cuddle up with a warm blanket and her favorite treat, hot dogs! She was brought to Survivor Tails 2 years ago as an owner surrender and warmed the hearts of everyone she met.

Scooter is currently living with a foster family, and is looking for a wonderful, permanent home where she can continue to live life to the fullest!

A Few Words from Scooter:

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Hi Everyone!  I’m Scooter! I am 9 years old, but you would never know it! I am very energetic and love to play with my foster Mom Shawna, and everyone else I meet. I love making new friends and showing off my modeling pictures, I have been told that I’m very photogenic! 

 

I also love wearing sweaters and finding a warm cuddly blanketscooter-3 to take a nap. I really like naps! I am not a big fan of the cold, but I love to sun bathe and hang out by the pool in the summer time. Some of my favorite foods are hot dogs and bully sticks, but I have a pretty adventurous palate. I haven’t tried anything I don’t like.

I love living with my foster family, but I really want a home and a family of my own!  I’m great with adults and teenagers, but I’d like a home with no other dogs, cats, or children.  I’d love to join your home–you can see more pictures of me here.  And, you can fill out an application for me at www.survivortails.org.